GEEK ART – The Secret Life of Heroes by Greg “Léon” Guillemin

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“Secret Life” by Grégoire “Léon” Guillemin… or how behave our favorite heroes after saving the world. It’s true, after all, they might be semi-gods, they remain no less human! They eat, they drink, they have their faults, like everyone else! Recently, Grégoire “Léon” Guillemin highlights this very intimate vision of heroes of pop culture through the prism of pop art 60s And given the success on the net by this series, the secret life of super hero apparently generates a strong interest in the world!

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Check this video about Greg “Léon” Guillemin

 

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The magic of the “Great Waters” of Versailles

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Versailles, a place “without water”

To animate the fountains of French gardens, the fountain of the 17th century used the force of gravity. Therefore they needed to have significant water resources located in height relative to the garden.

The Versailles Castle, built on a hill without sources and surrounded by swamps, does not lend to the creation of fountains. In 1661, Louis XIV began to embellish his father’s domain. He dreams of creating gardens with water games surpass those that he has admired in vaux-le – Vicomte.

 

The battle for water

Providing water to the ever more numerous fountains and store it in tanks at a higher altitude than the gardens, are the two challenges facing the engineers working in the king’s service.

To raise the water to tanks, different systems are used : operated rides horses, windmills or watermills. The more the water needs increase, the more the techniques employed are ambitious. Pierre Paul Riquet even offers to divert the Loire.

In 1684, the King inaugurates the Marly machine, designed by Arnold de Ville and Rennequin Sualem. This gigantic hydraulic pump brings water from the Seine to the Aqueduct of Louveciennes, located 165 meters above.

To carry out the creation of hydraulics, Louis XIV appealed to members of the Royal Academy of Sciences. In 1666, the brothers Francine test the first cast iron pipes.

 

The magic of Fountains

Happy marriage of science and art, the fountains of Versailles are the pride of Louis XIV. They decorate the promenade of the king, contribute to the success of outdoor festivals, testify to the power of the monarch.

When the King wants to personally honor a distinguished guest, he invited him to visit the gardens and presents his “Fountains”. As there is not enough water for all the fountains operate simultaneously, an ingenious scheme was developed: the fountain guardians will warn each other of the approach of the king by whistling. At the signal, they open the floodgates fountains with large keys.

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The “Great Waters” today

Today from April to October a show is organized and allows you to discover the magic of the waters of Versailles. The spectacle of the great waters is a fairy fountains and jets of water with background music to discover while walking in the gardens of the Palace of Versailles. Eight courses or sound zones were delineated and each were assigned one or more works, mostly from Lully but also Desmarest, Gluck and Rameau.

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Click on this video link to discover a teaser about the Versailles great waters show.

 

 

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Monnaie de Paris a Major Venue for Contemporary Art Exhibition

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La Monnaie de Paris – Quai Conti view

LA MONNAIE DE PARIS AND ITS MISSION
La Monnaie de Paris has a public service mission: the striking common currencies on its production site in Pessac (Gironde), for French euros like other currencies in Europe and in the world.

Maintaining a high tradition in crafts related to metal, it has another mission edition commemorative art: collection of coins, medals, decorations, art castings and jewelry, made on its historic site the Quai Conti (Paris 6th).

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HOTEL DES MONNAIES HISTORY
Hotel de la Monnaie de Paris was built during the reign of Louis XV, on the site of the Grand Hotel de Conti on the left bank of the Seine, the Paris Mint consists of a palace and a factory architect’s works Jacques Denis Antoine (1733-1801).

Splendid witness of neoclassical architecture, the main body of the Palace wife over a length of 117 meters line of Quai de Conti. It is flanked by two side wings on Conti Street and Guénégaud impasse. Dubbed a factory, the palace has a majestic reception room “Guillaume Dupré room”, the largest series of rooms in Paris overlooking the Seine and a staircase to the admirable proportions.

Finally the Monnaie de Paris has a small architectural gem: a mansion built by Jules Hardouin Mansart in 1669, also called “Wing Mansart.”

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EXHIBITION CENTRE OF CONTEMPORARY ART
La Monnaie de Paris also supports contemporary artistic creation. It thus presents exhibitions of French and international contemporary artists (David LaChapelle, Daniel Buren, Julien Berthier, Willy Ronis, Jean Prouvé) and participates in recurring events that combine other cultural institutions (Photoquai and the Parcours des Mondes first arts).

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Paul McCarthy Exhibition

You want to know more ? click on this link to see this great video about the Monnaie de Paris

 

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Turning Living Cells Into Art | Colonies

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A self-portrait of Tal Danino made from liver cells.

The last thing Brazilian multidisciplinary artist Vik Muniz imagined upon meeting MIT postdoctoral fellow, and self-described “bacteria enthusiast” Tal Danino.

Months later, from healthy cheek cells to cancer cells, Danino and Muniz were creating image after image of biogenerated beauty. Muniz, the 52-year-old artist responsible for using focused ion beam technology to etch sandcastles onto single grains of sand, explains: “I always love to collaborate with scientists because it gives me an idea that we can perhaps meet in the middle somewhere and make this perfect piece of art that’s exactly this combination between matter and meaning. Colonies is a collaboration between a scientist and an artist, trying to make pictures out of living things— tiny, tiny living things.” Crossing as many disciplines as the project did boundaries for both the artist and the scientist, it was an experiment wherein the rigid scientific method was complemented by the fluidity of the artistic process, and vice versa.

 

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‘Liver Cell Pattern 1.’
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A stadium printed with living bacteria and cells

Colonies is the fascinating result of what happens when the two dissociated disciplines of science and art find harmony in one another.

Watch this amazing video about Colonies.

 

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The Paris Army Museum – Hôtel des Invalides

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Army Museum – Invalides / Paris

To understand the history of the Army Museum we need to go back to the seventeenth century.

In the seventeenth century, when there was no structure to house disabled soldiers, Louis XIV decided by the 1670 order to build « un hostel royal pour y loger tous les officiers et soldats tant estropiés que vieux et caduques ».

Under the reign of Louis XIV hotel’s success is affirmed, nearly six thousand invalids will be admitted between 1676 and 1690. To heal the sick the hospital employs prestigious physicians and surgeons foreshadows the first modern hospital where hygiene rules are rigorous, and with active clinical research. And define the outset missions which the institution is now heir after more than three centuries of existence.

This hotel, where the spiritual life is an important part, is enriched in 1678 by the construction of the church of the soldiers, became St. Louis, then by that of the dome, or royal church, designed by Jules Hardouin-Mansart in 1706.

The Hotel des Invalides still hosts a hundred badly disabled war veterans of the French armies. The Authority of the mission is the National Institution invalid.

It was not until 1872 that the hotel gets a museum function: Artillery Museum in 1872 and the Historical Museum of Armed forces in 1896, the two are merged in the army museum in 1905.

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One of the Museum room

Today the museum with 8000 m² (museum, two churches) preserve 500 000 listed objects. These figures make the Museum of the Army’s the largest military history museum in France and one of the very first in the world.

The permanent collections are divided into so-called “historical” collections, corresponding to a chronological circuit from ancient times to the end of the Second World War, enriched with objects belonging to sets “thematic” (emblems, paintings, decorations …). These thematic collections are to be presented over the historic rooms or confined to specific areas.

The Dome Church (plan Mansart) with the highest openwork lantern at 107 m, the large fresco under the dome by Charles de La Fosse and its gilded dome in 1989 to mark the bicentenary of the French Revolution for the fifth time since its creation (12 kg of gold were necessary for this operation).

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Napoleon’s tomb

The museum is also a real military pantheon with the tombs housing the heart of Vauban, the remains of Turenne and the heart of the Tour d’Auvergne; The Dome mainly welcomes the tomb of Napoleon I, the graves of his brothers Joseph and Jerome Bonaparte his son, the King of Rome, General (Bertrand and Duroc) and marshals (Foch and Lyautey).

Check this great video about the museum.

 

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Soon a biennial in Antarctica ?

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Nadim Samman, curator at the TBA-21 in Vienna and Alexander Ponomarev, a Russian artist, announced that they were planning the organization of the First Biennial in Antarctica, according to The Art Newspaper.

Their plan is from the exhibition “Antarctopia”, which was presented at the Venice Architecture Biennale in 2014 in the pavilion dedicated to the polar continent. It was the first time that Antarctica was represented at the Biennale and the first time in the history of the event that was considered in its entirety as a full creative zone.

“The Biennial will bring together both scientists and artists on boats all around Antarctica in order to define a new Arctic culture beyond the institutional missions,” said Nadim Samman.

 

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Famous works of art transformed into buildings

Federico Babina illustrated a variety of houses in the style of famous artists. Among the well known artists are names such as Piet Mondrian, Gerhard Richter, Roy Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol, Keith Haring, Donald Judd, Picasso, Christo and some more well known artist names.

 

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Babina explores the symbiotic relationship between architecture and art, and how they would interact with each other.

You can check out the full Archist series on Federico Babina’s website.

 

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A Museum + Gardens + A Wineyard = Montmartre Museum in Paris

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Montmartre Museum and Renoir gardens

The Montmartre museum is certainly the most charming museum in Paris! It was created in 1960 in the oldest building in the Butte, who was also the place of residence of many artists as Auguste Renoir, Emile Bernard, Raoul Dufy, Suzanne Valadon, Maurice Utrillo, etc.

It houses a unique collection of paintings, posters and drawings and relive the history of the Butte, the artistic effervescence of its workshops, the Boat wash-house with Cortot workshop, and the atmosphere of its famous cabarets, the Lapin Agile at the Moulin Rouge.

You will also find next to the gardens museum Renoir Gardens, they were restored in memory of Auguste Renoir, impressionist painter who lived here in 1876 and 1877. During his stay, he painted several masterpieces whose Bal du moulin de la Galette and The Swing.

Renoir Gardens also offer a view of the vineyards of Clos Montmartre, the symbol of an ancient winemaking tradition that has its roots in Roman times and reached its peak in the late 18th century. Today the vineyard production is about 1100 bottles (all numbered). Public access is not allowed, except for special occasions, such as “Gardens Festival” held every fall since 1980 by the city of Paris.

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Clos Montmartre – Wineyard

Note that the grapes are pressed in the cellars of the town hall of the 18th district. Every year in October is organized in a Montmartre Harvest Festival of Montmartre, the wine is then sold at auction. The benefit is for the social welfare of the Butte.

Regarding the quality of the wine of Montmartre it was until the mid 1990s a wine of medium or poor quality. In 1995, the town hall of the 18th district hired an oenologist, Francis Gourdin, with the mission to make “real” wine from the vineyard, without the addition of foreign grapes or dyes, and avoiding any Chaptalisation.

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Vin Clos Montmartre

Check this video to see more about the museum.

 

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Wire Animal Sculptures

Contemporary sculptor, Kendra Haste works to represent wildlife through his creations composed only of distorted wire. British artist says fascinated by how a simple wire seemingly ordinary can turn into such a sense of movement and life, contour and volume; a contrast between lightness and weight, between solidity and transparency, values ​​that she loves finding in her work.

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Since she graduated from the Royal College output of the Arts London in 1998, Kendra has acquired a spectacular reputation in its field. Her work was soon featured in collections around the world. It is also part of the “society of wildlife artists” based in England and is a signatory to the “society of wildlife artists” in the United States. These grouped trying to promote the environment through the eyes (and hands) of talented artists.

Check this great video about Kendra Haste work.

 

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